Was Muhammad A Prophet?

“God does not see Muslims as the enemy, He sees them as the harvest.”

 

Deuteronomy 18:15-22 NIV

 

 proph•et

(ˈprɒf ɪt)

n.

  1. a person who speaks for God or a deity, or by divine inspiration.
  2. (in the Old Testament)
  3. a person chosen to speak for God and to guide the people of Israel.
  4. (often cap.) one of the Major or Minor Prophets.
  5. one of a class of persons in the early Christian church recognized as inspired to utter special revelations and predictions. 1 Cor.12:28.
  6. the Prophet,Muhammad, the founder of Islam.
  7. a person regarded as, or claiming to be, an inspired teacher or leader.
  8. a person who foretells the future.
  9. a person who speaks for some doctrine, cause, or movement.

an authoritative person who divines the future

15 The LORD your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among your own brothers. You must listen to him. 16 For this is what you asked of the LORD your God at Horeb on the day of the assembly when you said, “Let us not hear the voice of the LORD our God nor see this great fire anymore, or we will die.” 17 The LORD said to me: “What they say is good. 18 I will raise up for them a prophet like you from among their brothers; I will put my words in his mouth, and he will tell them everything I command him. 19 If anyone does not listen to my words that the prophet speaks in my name, I myself will call him to account. 20 But a prophet who presumes to speak in my name anything I have not commanded him to say, or a prophet who speaks in the name of other gods, must be put to death.” 21 You may say to yourselves, “How can we know when a message has not been spoken by the LORD?” 22 If what a prophet proclaims in the name of the LORD does not take place or come true, that is a message the LORD has not spoken. That prophet has spoken presumptuously. Do not be afraid of him.

Deuteronomy 18:15-22 NIV

WHO IS THE PROPHET OF DEUTERONOMY 18:18?

The following is from answering-islam

 

by Silas

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Muhammad claimed that the Bible foretold his prophethood.  Today many Muslim apologists claim that the term “brethren” in Deuteronomy 18:15 and 18:18, could include anyone who is a descendant of Abraham.  They believe that since Muhammad was an assumed descendant of Ishmael, Abraham’s first son, then Muhammad qualifies as a ‘brother’ to the Israelites, and is indeed the prophet who Moses foretold in Deuteronomy 18:18.

 

The New Testament tells us that Jesus is the prophet Moses foretold (Acts 3:22).  Let’s examine the biblical evidence and see if Muhammad has a claim to be the prophet foretold by Moses.

 


 

CONTEXT OF “BRETHREN”

 

To begin with, the term used for ‘brethren’ is used in a variety of ways in the Old Testament, (Taurat, Zabur).  What must be addressed is the context for the term ‘brethren’.  If the context of how it is used means anyone loosely related to the Israelites, then perhaps it is possible that Muhammad could be the prophet. If the context means that the future prophet is to be an Israelite, then Muhammad could not be that prophet.

 

In one sense, since Muslims and Christians believe that all humans are descendants of Adam and Eve, then all of us are brothers and sisters.  But Muslims insist that the meaning of “brethren” in the Deuteronomy 18:18 verse is one who is a descendant of Abraham, not Adam.  Is their definition valid?  What is the context for the use of the term “brethren” in the Old Testament, and specifically, Deuteronomy?

 

 

Here are three different ways the term ‘brethren’ is used in Deuteronomy:

 

1) used for relating the 12 tribes together,

2) used to relate the Levites amongst themselves as brothers, as in 18:7

3) used to relate the Israelites to the Edomites, as in 2:4.

 

 

I did research into the way the term ‘brethren’ is used throughout the Old Testament.  I found that the Hebrew word is ‘awkh’.  It generally means ‘a brother’ used in the widest sense of literal relationships, and metaphorically, having an affinity or resemblance.  ‘awkh’ is also translated (in the King James Version – I’m using a Strong’s King James Version concordance) ‘another’ as in 1 Chr 26:12, (‘relatives’ in New International Version), as ‘like’ in Ezekiel: 18.10, and as ‘other’ in Genesis 13:11.

 

Brown’s Hebrew lexicon also reinforced Strong’s definition.  It states that the word can be translated in various ways:  1) as brother, meaning born of the same mother,   2) indefinite relative, a kinship in a wider sense, as in Lot being a ‘brother’ of Abraham in Genesis 13:8… Lot was Abram’s nephew, not literal brother, or the Israelite tribes being brothers, or as in Israel and Edom being brothers, and likewise for Israel and Judah.

 

It is also used to denote close friendships like 2 Samuel 1:26 – the relationship between David and Jonathan, or used for allies – as in Amos 1:9.

 

Brown’s also states that it is used as a figure of resemblance as in Job 30:29… Job was not the literal brother to a jackal, Job was identifying with being abandoned.  And, it is used to denote the cherubim facing each other in Exodus 25:20, and as ‘the sight’ of a crocodile in Job 41:9!

 

Another verse I found is in Proverbs 18:9 “One who is slack in his work is brother to him who destroys”.  Again, the use is metaphorical.

 

All of the above shows that the term ‘awkh’ can be used in various ways; part of its specific meaning being defined by the context in which it is used.

 

 

So, digging deeper into the contexts of how “brethren” is used start with the book of Deuteronomy.  The first clue to the context of “brethren” is from the purpose of the book of Deuteronomy itself. The name Deuteronomy means ‘copy of the law’;  the law for who? – the Israelites, no one else.  This book was given specifically to the Israelites, it was Moses’ farewell address to them.  A large part of it was a review of the laws between God and the Israelites, and its reading was to prepare them to enter into the promised land.

 

Next, I took a look at how the term ‘brethren’ (King James Version) is used throughout Deuteronomy.  I found that it is used about 20 times, at least 14 times it means ‘fellow Israelites’ – members of the 12 tribes.  Twice it is used to ref. the Edomites, and once for Levitical brothers, once for literal brothers (25:5), and twice for the verses in question:  18:15,18.

 

Therefore, the overwhelming majority of times the context is used for referring to ‘fellow Israelites’.

 

 

 

So let’s carefully examine the verses in question, and see if we can find any clues to the context in question.  Let’s start with verse 14.  The New International Version uses ‘brothers’ usually in place of the King James Version ‘brethren’.  Words in ( ) parenthesis are mine.  From Deut. 18:

 

14:  “The nations you (i.e. the Israelites) will dispossess listen to those who practice sorcery or divination.  But as for you (the Israelites), the Lord your (the Israelites) God has not permitted you (the Israelites) to do so.

 

15:  The Lord your God will raise up for you (the Israelites) a prophet like me from among your (the Israelites) own “brothers”.  You (the Israelites) must listen to him.

 

16:  For this is what you (the Israelites) asked of the Lord your God at Horeb on the day of the assembly when you (the Israelites) said, “Let us (the Israelites) not hear the voice of the Lord our God nor see this great fire anymore, or we (the Israelites) will die.”

 

17:  The Lord said to me “What they (the Israelites) say is good.

 

18:  I will raise up for them (the Israelites) a prophet like you from among their (the Israelites) brothers; I will put my words in his mouth, and he will tell them (the Israelites) everything I command him.

 

19:  If anyone (the Israelites) does not listen to my words that the prophet speaks in my name, I myself will call him (an Israelite) to account.

 

 

 

It’s very clear here that the context for ‘brethren’ is from amongst the fellow Israelites.  Not an Edomite, or other non-Israelite, who were not given the law, not part of the group Moses was addressing. Moses meant that the prophet would come out of the 12 Israelite tribes.

 

We should also try to cross reference to other verses in Deuteronomy to see if we can get additional understanding of the context.  In Deuteronomy 2:4, 8, ‘brethren’ was used in conjunction with the Edomites, who were basically their cousins.  Moses plainly described who the brothers were… what the context of them being brethren was (i.e. Edomites being the descendants of Esau).  By understanding the context here we would not confuse the Edomite ‘brethren’ with the Levitical ‘brethren’ found in 18:7, or the Israelite ‘brethren’ found in 1:16 or 33:24.  Edomite ‘brethren’ would clearly not fit the context for 18:7, 1:16, or 33:24.

 

 

 

In Deut 17:15 a very strong statement is given regarding who “brothers” means in the verses in chapter 18:

 

“Be sure to appoint over you the King the Lord your God chooses.  He must be “FROM AMONG YOUR OWN BROTHERS”.  Do not place a foreigner over you, one who is not a “BROTHER ISRAELITE”.

 

 

Compare these terms with 18:15 –

 

“The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me FROM AMONG YOUR OWN BROTHERS.  You must listen to him.”

 

 

Clearly, this verse has much in common with 17:15.  Moses did not add ‘brother Israelite’, because they understood what he was talking about based upon what he had said just a few moments earlier in Chapter 17.  The context is the same for both.  The future prophet had to be a fellow Israelite.

 

Therefore, the weight of the evidence for understanding the context – and who actually the “brethren” were, shows clearly that the future prophet had to be from the 12 tribes.  Jesus fulfills that requirement, Muhammad does not.

 

 

 

Was it Gabriel or Satan?

 

When Muhammad first began receiving revelation he thought to be from Allah, it was the angel Gabriel who brought Allah’s message to him. Or so at least that’s what Muhamammad thought. But was it actually Gabriel?

 

Let’s see what Muhammad’s initial encounter with Gabriel was like, and discover what emotional state this encounter left Muhammad. Two traditions (hadith) provide essentially the same story with slight variances.

 

Sahih Muslim, Book 1, Hadith 301

 

There came to him the angel and said: Recite, to which he replied: I am not lettered. He took hold of me [the Apostle said] and pressed me, till I was hard pressed; thereafter he let me off and said: Recite. I said: I am not lettered. He then again took hold of me and pressed me for the second time till I was hard pressed and then let me off and said: Recite, to which I replied: I am not lettered. He took hold of me and pressed me for the third time, till I was hard pressed and then let me go and said: Recite in the name of your Lord Who created, created man from a clot of blood. Recite. And your most bountiful Lord is He Who taught the use of pen, taught man what he knew not (al-Qur’an, xcvi. 1-4). Then the Prophet returned therewith, his heart was trembling, and he went to Khadija and said: Wrap me up, wrap me up! So they wrapped him till the fear had left him. He then said to Khadija: O Khadija! what has happened to me? and he informed her of the happening, saying: I fear for myself.

 

Bukhari, Book 1, Volume 1, Hadith 3

 

The angel came to him and asked him to read. The Prophet replied, “I do not know how to read.

 

The Prophet added, “The angel caught me (forcefully) and pressed me so hard that I could not bear it any more. He then released me and again asked me to read and I replied, ‘I do not know how to read.’ Thereupon he caught me again and pressed me a second time till I could not bear it any more. He then released me and again asked me to read but again I replied, ‘I do not know how to read (or what shall I read)?’ Thereupon he caught me for the third time and pressed me, and then released me and said, ‘Read in the name of your Lord, who has created (all that exists) has created man from a clot. Read! And your Lord is the Most Generous.” (96.1, 96.2, 96.3) Then Allah’s Apostle returned with the Inspiration and with his heart beating severely. Then he went to Khadija bint Khuwailid and said, “Cover me! Cover me!” They covered him till his fear was over and after that he told her everything that had happened and said, “I fear that something may happen to me.”

Two questions arise from Muhammad’s encounter with Gabriel. Why did a visitation with a messenger from God leave Muhammad in a state of panic and complete fear? Why would a messenger from God physically assault Muhammad?

 

Let’s contrast Muhammad’s encounter with Gabriel to biblical encounters with Gabriel to see if there are any similarities or differences.

 

Daniel had an encounter with Gabriel, who was showing him a vision of end times. In Daniel 8:15-17 we read:

 

When I, Daniel, had seen the vision, I sought to understand it. And behold, there stood before me one having the appearance of a man. And I heard a man’s voice between the banks of the Ulai, and it called, “Gabriel, make this man understand the vision.” So he came near where I stood. And when he came, I was frightened and fell on my face. But he said to me, “Understand, O son of man, that the vision is for the time of the end.

 

Notice Daniel was initially frightened and fell on his face. But immediately Gabriel spoke words of comfort to ease Daniel’s fears and to help him understand what he was seeing. And Gabriel did not attack Daniel physically in order to make him understand.

 

We see two encounters with Gabriel in the New Testament. The first is found in Luke 1:13 where Gabriel announces to Zacharias and Elizabeth the coming birth of John the Baptist.

 

But the angel said to him, “Do not be afraid, Zacharias, for your prayer is heard; and your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you shall call his name John.

 

Another very similar encounter is documented a few verses later in Luke 1:26-30 when Gabriel announces the coming birth of Jesus to Joseph and Mary.

 

Now in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent by God to a city of Galilee named Nazareth, to a virgin betrothed to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David. The virgin’s name was Mary. And having come in, the angel said to her, “Rejoice, highly favored one, the Lord is with you; blessed are you among women!” But when she saw him, she was troubled at his saying, and considered what manner of greeting this was. Then the angel said to her, “Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found favor with God. And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bring forth a Son, and shall call His name Jesus.

 

In both of these encounters recorded in Luke we see something markedly different than the encounter Muhammad experienced. Rather then leaving Elizabeth and Mary in a state of fear, Gabriel assured and comforted them by telling them “Do not be afraid.” And again Gabriel did not physically assault either Elizabeth or Mary in order to make his point.

 

Are we seeing an entirely different Gabriel than the one who visited Muhammad? Or asked another way, did Muhammad actually encounter Gabriel, or was it an imposter posing as Gabriel? What sort of being would instill in Muhammad a feeling of dread and utter fear? What sort of being would assault Muhammad physically?

 

The answer can be found in the earliest biography of Muhammad, written a mere 130 years after his death.

 

Ibn Ishaq records Muhammad was concerned he might be demonically possessed. He was so disturbed by this possibility that three times he threatened to commit suicide by jumping off the mountain side, and three times he was stopped by someone claiming to be Gabriel.

 

So I read it, and he departed from me. And I awoke from my sleep, and it was as though these words were written on my heart. Now none of God’s creatures was more hateful to me than an (ecstatic) poet or a man possessed: I could not even look at them. I thought, Woe is me poet or possessed—Never shall Quraysh say this of me! I will go to the top of the mountain and throw myself down that I may kill myself and gain rest. So I went forth to do so and then when I was midway on the mountain, I heard a voice from heaven saying, “O Muhammad! thou art the apostle of God and I am Gabriel.” I raised my head towards heaven to see (who was speaking), and lo, Gabriel in the form of a man with feet astride the horizon, saying, “O Muhammad! thou art the apostle of God and I am Gabriel.” I stood gazing at him, and that turned me from my purpose moving neither forward nor backward; then I began to turn my face away from him, but towards whatever region of the sky I looked, I saw him as before. And I continued standing there, neither advancing nor turning back, until Khadlja sent her messengers in search of me and they gained the high ground above Mecca and returned to her while I was standing in the same place; then he parted from me and I from him, returning to my family. And I came to Khadija and sat by her thigh and drew close to her. She said, “O Abii’l-Qasim,2 where hast thou been ? By God, I sent my messen­gers in search of thee, and they reached the high ground above Mecca and returned to me.” I said to her, “Woe is me poet or possessed.”

 

Was Muhammad inspired by a demon rather than God?

 

The Qur’an stands in opposition to nearly every Biblical doctrine. According to the Qur’an, Jesus was not crucified, did not rise from the dead to conquer death, man is saved on the basis of doing more good than bad, Jesus was not God but merely a prophet and not even the most significant prophet, God does not love everyone unconditionally, and the list goes on. Who would have authored a book that stands against everything God said in the Bible?

 

According to the Bible, it is Satan who stands in opposition to everything God said. In the Garden of Eden, he cause Eve to become confused and succumb to temptation by questioning God: “Has God really said …”. At the start of Jesus’ ministry, Satan tempted Jesus in the same way. Satan was cast out of heaven for an issue of pride, wanting to be like God himself. For that rebellion against God, he and a third of the angelic host were cast down to earth, where Satan now tries to mislead as many as possible from following God.

 

The Qur’an stands in opposition to God. Satan operates in opposition to God. Muhammad thought he might have encountered a demonic spirit. Does anyone notice a connection here?

 

Yes, I believe Muhammad likely was influenced by demonic forces. I believe the Qur’an is inspired by Satan himself. I do not believe Muhammad was visited by the angel Gabriel of the Bible but by Satan masquerading as Gabriel. The puzzle pieces all fit together. This is the only logical conclusion, given the evidence.

Was Muhammad a prophet?

Muslims claim that the proof that Muhammad was a prophet is in the Bible, so he must be a true prophet.

“I will raise up for them a Prophet like you from among their brethren, and will put My words in His mouth, and He shall speak to them all that I command Him. And it shall be that whoever will not hear My words, which He speaks in My name, I will require it of him.”

Deuteronomy 18:18-19

They point to the above verse as proof that Muhammad is a true prophet of God (Allah) but the truth is the above verse could apply to anybody, it could even apply to me or to you. What they fail to acknowledge is the rest of the verse that proves that Muhammad was NOT a Prophet:

“But the prophet who presumes to speak a word in My name, which I have not commanded him to speak, or who speaks in the name of other gods, that prophet shall die.’ And if you say in your heart, ‘How shall we know the word which the Lord has not spoken?’ – when a prophet speaks in the name of the Lord, if the thing does not happen or come to pass, that is the thing which the Lord has not spoken; the prophet has spoken it presumptuously; you shall not be afraid of him.”

(Deuteronomy 18:20-22)

A true prophet of God speaks the truth that God reveals to him. Deuteronomy 18:20-22 says that a true prophet is perfect and never wrong. Therefore, when someone claims to be speaking for God and then makes a statement that does not come to pass, that person “has spoken presumptuously” and is NOT God’s prophet. Muhammad not only did not speak the truth, he attributed his mistakes to Satan.

“Why do you not understand My speech? Because you are not able to listen to My word. You are of your father, the devil, and the desires of your father you want to do. He was a murderer from the beginning, and does not stand in the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he speaks a lie, he speaks from his own resources, for he is a liar and the father of it.”

John 8:43-44

Jesus identified the Satanic origin of lying. He also said:

“Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ravenous wolves. You will know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes from thorn bushes or figs from thistles? Even so, every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit.”

Matthew 7:15-17)

 

In other words, a true prophet who is following God’s word will be honest and do good things but a false prophet will lie and do evil things.

 

Why is it important to know Muhammad? Because over a billion people

try to be like him and do as he did. Consequently, the insanity of one man is

bequeathed to all his followers. It is by understanding him that we can see

a false prophet whom God said “is set for death”.

 

proph•et
(ˈprɒf ɪt)

n.
1. a person who speaks for God or a deity, or by divine inspiration.
2. (in the Old Testament)
a. a person chosen to speak for God and to guide the people of Israel.
b. (often cap.) one of the Major or Minor Prophets.
3. one of a class of persons in the early Christian church recognized as inspired to utter special revelations and predictions. 1 Cor.12:28.
4. the Prophet, Muhammad, the founder of Islam.
5. a person regarded as, or claiming to be, an inspired teacher or leader.
6. a person who foretells the future.
7. a person who speaks for some doctrine, cause, or movement.
an authoritative person who divines the future
WHO IS THE PROPHET OF DEUTERONOMY 18:18?
The following is from answering-islam

by Silas

INTRODUCTION

Muhammad claimed that the Bible foretold his prophethood. Today many Muslim apologists claim that the term “brethren” in Deuteronomy 18:15 and 18:18, could include anyone who is a descendant of Abraham. They believe that since Muhammad was an assumed descendant of Ishmael, Abraham’s first son, then Muhammad qualifies as a ‘brother’ to the Israelites, and is indeed the prophet who Moses foretold in Deuteronomy 18:18.

The New Testament tells us that Jesus is the prophet Moses foretold (Acts 3:22). Let’s examine the biblical evidence and see if Muhammad has a claim to be the prophet foretold by Moses.


CONTEXT OF “BRETHREN”

To begin with, the term used for ‘brethren’ is used in a variety of ways in the Old Testament, (Taurat, Zabur). What must be addressed is the context for the term ‘brethren’. If the context of how it is used means anyone loosely related to the Israelites, then perhaps it is possible that Muhammad could be the prophet. If the context means that the future prophet is to be an Israelite, then Muhammad could not be that prophet.

In one sense, since Muslims and Christians believe that all humans are descendants of Adam and Eve, then all of us are brothers and sisters. But Muslims insist that the meaning of “brethren” in the Deuteronomy 18:18 verse is one who is a descendant of Abraham, not Adam. Is their definition valid? What is the context for the use of the term “brethren” in the Old Testament, and specifically, Deuteronomy?

Here are three different ways the term ‘brethren’ is used in Deuteronomy:

1) used for relating the 12 tribes together,
2) used to relate the Levites amongst themselves as brothers, as in 18:7
3) used to relate the Israelites to the Edomites, as in 2:4.

I did research into the way the term ‘brethren’ is used throughout the Old Testament. I found that the Hebrew word is ‘awkh’. It generally means ‘a brother’ used in the widest sense of literal relationships, and metaphorically, having an affinity or resemblance. ‘awkh’ is also translated (in the King James Version – I’m using a Strong’s King James Version concordance) ‘another’ as in 1 Chr 26:12, (‘relatives’ in New International Version), as ‘like’ in Ezekiel: 18.10, and as ‘other’ in Genesis 13:11.

Brown’s Hebrew lexicon also reinforced Strong’s definition. It states that the word can be translated in various ways: 1) as brother, meaning born of the same mother, 2) indefinite relative, a kinship in a wider sense, as in Lot being a ‘brother’ of Abraham in Genesis 13:8… Lot was Abram’s nephew, not literal brother, or the Israelite tribes being brothers, or as in Israel and Edom being brothers, and likewise for Israel and Judah.

It is also used to denote close friendships like 2 Samuel 1:26 – the relationship between David and Jonathan, or used for allies – as in Amos 1:9.

Brown’s also states that it is used as a figure of resemblance as in Job 30:29… Job was not the literal brother to a jackal, Job was identifying with being abandoned. And, it is used to denote the cherubim facing each other in Exodus 25:20, and as ‘the sight’ of a crocodile in Job 41:9!

Another verse I found is in Proverbs 18:9 “One who is slack in his work is brother to him who destroys”. Again, the use is metaphorical.

All of the above shows that the term ‘awkh’ can be used in various ways; part of its specific meaning being defined by the context in which it is used.

So, digging deeper into the contexts of how “brethren” is used start with the book of Deuteronomy. The first clue to the context of “brethren” is from the purpose of the book of Deuteronomy itself. The name Deuteronomy means ‘copy of the law’; the law for who? – the Israelites, no one else. This book was given specifically to the Israelites, it was Moses’ farewell address to them. A large part of it was a review of the laws between God and the Israelites, and its reading was to prepare them to enter into the promised land.

Next, I took a look at how the term ‘brethren’ (King James Version) is used throughout Deuteronomy. I found that it is used about 20 times, at least 14 times it means ‘fellow Israelites’ – members of the 12 tribes. Twice it is used to ref. the Edomites, and once for Levitical brothers, once for literal brothers (25:5), and twice for the verses in question: 18:15,18.

Therefore, the overwhelming majority of times the context is used for referring to ‘fellow Israelites’.

So let’s carefully examine the verses in question, and see if we can find any clues to the context in question. Let’s start with verse 14. The New International Version uses ‘brothers’ usually in place of the King James Version ‘brethren’. Words in ( ) parenthesis are mine. From Deut. 18:

14: “The nations you (i.e. the Israelites) will dispossess listen to those who practice sorcery or divination. But as for you (the Israelites), the Lord your (the Israelites) God has not permitted you (the Israelites) to do so.

15: The Lord your God will raise up for you (the Israelites) a prophet like me from among your (the Israelites) own “brothers”. You (the Israelites) must listen to him.

16: For this is what you (the Israelites) asked of the Lord your God at Horeb on the day of the assembly when you (the Israelites) said, “Let us (the Israelites) not hear the voice of the Lord our God nor see this great fire anymore, or we (the Israelites) will die.”

17: The Lord said to me “What they (the Israelites) say is good.

18: I will raise up for them (the Israelites) a prophet like you from among their (the Israelites) brothers; I will put my words in his mouth, and he will tell them (the Israelites) everything I command him.

19: If anyone (the Israelites) does not listen to my words that the prophet speaks in my name, I myself will call him (an Israelite) to account.

It’s very clear here that the context for ‘brethren’ is from amongst the fellow Israelites. Not an Edomite, or other non-Israelite, who were not given the law, not part of the group Moses was addressing. Moses meant that the prophet would come out of the 12 Israelite tribes.

We should also try to cross reference to other verses in Deuteronomy to see if we can get additional understanding of the context. In Deuteronomy 2:4, 8, ‘brethren’ was used in conjunction with the Edomites, who were basically their cousins. Moses plainly described who the brothers were… what the context of them being brethren was (i.e. Edomites being the descendants of Esau). By understanding the context here we would not confuse the Edomite ‘brethren’ with the Levitical ‘brethren’ found in 18:7, or the Israelite ‘brethren’ found in 1:16 or 33:24. Edomite ‘brethren’ would clearly not fit the context for 18:7, 1:16, or 33:24.

In Deut 17:15 a very strong statement is given regarding who “brothers” means in the verses in chapter 18:

“Be sure to appoint over you the King the Lord your God chooses. He must be “FROM AMONG YOUR OWN BROTHERS”. Do not place a foreigner over you, one who is not a “BROTHER ISRAELITE”.

Compare these terms with 18:15 –

“The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me FROM AMONG YOUR OWN BROTHERS. You must listen to him.”

Clearly, this verse has much in common with 17:15. Moses did not add ‘brother Israelite’, because they understood what he was talking about based upon what he had said just a few moments earlier in Chapter 17. The context is the same for both. The future prophet had to be a fellow Israelite.

Therefore, the weight of the evidence for understanding the context – and who actually the “brethren” were, shows clearly that the future prophet had to be from the 12 tribes. Jesus fulfills that requirement, Muhammad does not.

Muhammad spoke the words of Satan in the satanic verses in Surah 53:19-21. Muhammad claims to speak in the name of Allah and even makes this surprising remark: “I have fabricated things against God and have imputed to Him words which He has not spoken.” – The History of al-Tabari, Volume VI: Muhammad at Mecca pg.111. If you are still not convinced that Muhammad was a false prophet then take a look at this following Surah: Surah 69:44-46 And if he had fabricated against Us (Allah) some of the sayings, We would certainly have seized him by the right hand, Then We (Allah) would certainly have cut off his aorta. The Qur’an says in the above Surahs that a false prophet would be killed by Allah by cutting off the false prophet’s aorta, lo and behold, Muhammad dies in the same way by poisoning and he is described as having his aorta severed in Sunan Abi Dawud 4512:
4512. Wahb bin Baqiyyah narrated to us, from Khalid, from Muhammad bin ‘Amr, from AbU Salamah, from AbU Hurairah, who said: “The Messenger of Allah iii used to accept gifts but he did not eat (that which was given in) charity.” And Wahb bin Baqiyyah narrated to us, elsewhere, from KhAlid, from Muhammad bin ‘Amr, that AbU Salamah – and he did not mention AbU Hurairah – said: “The Messenger of Allah used to accept gifts, but he did not eat (that which was given in) charity.” And he added: “A Jewish woman in Khaibar gave him a roasted sheep that she had poisoned, and the Messenger of Allah ate from it, as did the people. He said: ‘Lift up your hands (meaning, stop eating), for it – -, has told me that it is poisoned. Bishr bin A1-Barã’ bin Ma’rur AlAnsãrI died (of that poison), and he sent word to the Jewish woman 1S : asking: ‘What made you do what you did?’ She said: If you were a * Prophet it would not harm you, and if you were a king the people would have been rid of you.’ The Messenger of Allah ordered that she be killed, then he said during his final illness: ‘I continued to feel pain because of the morsel that I ate at Khaibar, but now it has cut off my aorta.” (Ijasan)

And from the Bible, Deuteronomy 18:18-22
18 I will raise up for them a prophet like you from among their fellow Israelites, and I will put my words in his mouth. He will tell them everything I command him. 19 I myself will call to account anyone who does not listen to my words that the prophet speaks in my name. 20 But a prophet who presumes to speak in my name anything I have not commanded, or a prophet who speaks in the name of other gods, is to be put to death.”
21 You may say to yourselves, “How can we know when a message has not been spoken by the Lord?” 22 If what a prophet proclaims in the name of the Lord does not take place or come true, that is a message the Lord has not spoken. That prophet has spoken presumptuously, so do not be alarmed.
Muhammad didn’t just die, he was put to death by a Jewish woman who poisoned him, Just as the Bible said a false prophet would die. Now add that with even a hadith that said if something was spoken that God didn’t say, his aorta would be cut! And it was.
There are many errors, inaccuracies, and lies in the Quran and his hadiths that Muhammad spoke which proves he was not a prophet.
We will list many of them in other sections of this web site.

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